How do you act when you are interrupted?

I liked this piece on the importance of humility in leadership.  I have posted here and here on this issue, but this one brought more practically to the subject which I appreciated.

The need for humility in leadership may not be obvious when you think of the stereotype of leaders who should be confident taking decisions and giving direction.  To me the why of humility in leadership is a fusion of understanding that: you need a lot more information than you have to do your job, you may be your best version of a leader when you are in service to everyone, and that humility will help you build endurance for the journey.

From this piece, I particularly liked the test  to ask yourself the question “How do you act when you are interrupted?” (and ask yourself how you’d react when you are busy and when it is someone below you on the org chart).

It’s a brilliantly simple question and it hits at an area of deliberate growth for me in the past few years.  I work in an open concept office so there is no easy way to signal when I am trying to get through something and would prefer not be interrupted.  Though I am sure that I have spent too long acting perturbed that I have been interrupted, I have now taken the decision to treat my entire work day (with rare, clearly announced exceptions) as if I am hosting office hours.  This isn’t to say that I can give each conversation its due at the moment it is proposed – sometimes a sit down meeting is more appropriate and at times I am on my way somewhere.  That said, as a default, I want to be as present as I can for what people are coming to say.

I have learned good habits on this from observing others.  I used to marvel at senior leaders who acted as if they had all the time in the world to listen to you brief when I would be distracted at thinking about how busy they were and how I didn’t want to waste their time with a long briefing.  I then resolved to also be calm and clearly in receiving mode when employees would come and talk to me since expressing irritation, anger or panic do not support receiving the information needed.

Humility may save you from a mindset that won’t serve you well when you hit unfamiliar terrain.  The more you think you should (already) know how to be a good leader including from being told that you have inherent talent for the job, the less prepared you are to succeed when you reach an unfamiliar situation.  Carol Dweck makes a great point in this piece on mindset and leadership – it is much easier to have humility at the beginning of your management career and this wanes over time.  So the ultimate question is how to continue to show humility the longer you stay in a management role and no matter the stress you are feeling.

 

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